5.2.16

#545 Lost in Rosie






We are naturally aspirational creatures, and can’t help chasing after perfection. Nearly every person on the planet wishes they had perfect skin or the perfect body. The funny thing about perfection is that it’s a slippery concept. 300 years ago the ideal woman had small breasts, round hips and thunder thighs. In 1920s America a flat chested boyish figure with a round face and teeny tiny lips was the beauty ideal. Women would actually bind their breasts in order to achieve a flatter look. I most definitely am glad I was not born in the 1920’s.


Effectively, you are not the one who decides how to be beautiful, the culture around you does, through the movies, fashion advertisements and editorials it produces. Ideals change with the trends. One small spark can set off a forest fire, and all it takes is one small seed of an idea to be planted to change how everyone sees the world. Before the young and very girlish Kate Moss came along models were women. Supermodels like Cindy Crawford had curves, muscles and broadness. Their whole presence was about feminine strength. But Kate Moss transfixed everyone with what was considered a strange kind of beauty at the time. Kate was small, short, extremely thin and charmingly imperfect. Editors pointed out how she had the look of a heroin addict, and then called her a “heroin chic” – in which a radically new form of beauty was born. It was the spark that set the whole industry on fire.


Photoshop the programme was launched on February 19, 1990, just four months before Kate Moss’ big modeling debut on the cover of The Face magazine. It was a remarkable coincidence. Photoshop would go on to have as profound an effect on the fashion industry as Kate would have on the appearance of models. It was a decided turning point in our cultural perception of beauty – a point at which our standards and expectations would begin to grow unreasonably high. Skin would become waxy smooth, teeth flawlessly white, the body without a single fold, wrinkle, vein or bulge. Suddenly smiling faces had no natural laugh lines and slouching bodies no sign of skin folds. These are simply things that all bodies do, but thanks to the extensive use of Photoshop in the media, the natural began to be not quite what our real bodies and faces are supposed to look like.


In Secondlife the flawless beauty still remains, the slight curve of the waist but the long elongated legs is still around. Such beauty is what our designer for the day has created for us and that being Elysium, and the beauty that awaits you of ‘Rosie’.


In Secondlife there is no harm to use Photoshop, but do you think we should be photoshopping real beauty? Isn’t the flaws all a matter of who we all are?


Showcasing for you today, I bring to you the awesome collection of works from the following artists: -


 Destinations: - Elysium @ Shiny Shabby , Tableau Vivant and Emery @ Collabor88


 Elysium Rosie Skin: – (New) @ Shiny Shabby
Tableau Vivant: – Twist Hair  - Blonde – (New) @ Collabor88
Emery Station Crop Top: – (New) @ Collabor88

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